Recent Lectures:

Selected Publications:

  • ‘Review: Ineffability: An Exercise in Comparative Philosophy of Religion, ed. T. D. Knepper & L. E. Kalmanson’, Expository Times, 129.6 (forthcoming 2018).
  • ‘Review: Nothingness and the Meaning of Life: Philosophical Approaches to Ultimate Meaning Through Nothing and Reflexivity, by Nicholas Waghorn’, Journal of Moral Philosophy (forthcoming).
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Guy Bennett-Hunter dans «Tillich and Divine Ineffabililty» affirme l‘étroite correlation entre l’affirmation tillichienne de l’ineffabilité divine et le rejet de l’ontothéologie. L’affirmation de leur incompatibilité lui semble une contribution majeure de Tillich à la pensée religieuse. Guy Bennett-Hunter part des déclarations bien connues où Tillich affirme que l’on ne saurait, à proprement parler, attribuer l’existence a Dieu puisque Dieu est «être même au-delà de l’essence et de l’existence». En d’autres termes, Dieu «mystére de l’être», «fondement et abîme de la raison», résiste à la connaissance conceptuelle et à l’articulation linguistique.
— Anne Marie Reijnen & France Farago
  • ‘The Imagination in the Travel Literature of Xavier de Maistre and its Philosophical Significance’, in Garth Lean, Russell Staiff and Emma Warterton (eds.), Travel and Imagination (Farnham: Ashgate, 2014), 75–88.
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Bennett-Hunter ... introduces us to the imaginary journeys of French writers Xavier de Maistre and Joris-Karl Huysmans. [He] uses their work as catalysts for a broader philosophical exploration of travel and imagination, through which we are granted the very real sense that ... the imagination, rather than the more often cited ‘reason’ ... defines what it is to be human. This [essay is a] philosophical tour de force.
— Garl Lean, Russell Staiff & Emma Waterton
  • ‘Natural Theology and Literature’, in Russell Re Manning (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013), 551–565.
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The breadth of the survey’s engagement with the arts is especially noteworthy: it includes, for instance, an exquisite reflection by Guy Bennett-Hunter (Chapter 35).
— James Orr
  • ‘Christmas Mythologies: Sacred and Secular’ in Scott C. Lowe (ed.), Christmas—Philosophy for Everyone (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010), 59–69.
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In [his essay, Bennett-Hunter] reminds us that there are two myths that are part of Christmas. On the one hand, there is the myth of Santa Claus [and] on the other hand, the religious myths. These myths we are often reluctant to give up as we mature, remaining ‘agnostic’ about their literal truth. In his essay, Bennett-Hunter pushes us to get off the fence about religious myths. Appealing to the work of Paul Tillich, he argues that the lessons of [religion] are to be found in its myths, and worrying about whether they’re literally true will just distract us from those lessons. Just as we grow out of believing in Santa Claus, so we ought to grow out of regarding the Christmas story as literally true. Only then can we understand its true message.
— Scott C. Lowe